This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products we think you’ll

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products we think you’ll love. Featured products are independently selected and linked to for your convenience. If you buy something using a link on this page, Forbes may receive a small share of that sale. Replacing your old thermostat with something digital (that doesn’t look like an LED clock from the ’80s) shouldn’t be hard. But it is. Every manufacturer boasts about the same features—but which product is ultimately best for your household and lifestyle? If you’re looking for something that looks futuristic, the Glas Smart Thermostat is a great first choice. It looks like nothing else on the market and the transparent touchscreen practically disappears when the display is inactive, blending with your walls. It also does the digital thermostat things you’d expect, like keeping schedules and working with an app for programming. And it even has Microsoft Cortana built in, so you can speak to it for changing settings. Plus, Glas has an air quality sensor, something most other smart thermostats lack. Glas can even sense if you’re home or away, so don’t have to ...

E-cig companies use vape trick videos to market products, study shows

A decidedly lit phenomenon is the subject of a new study from a group of Yale researchers: vape trick videos on YouTube. The researchers previously found that — right behind fruity flavors — young people say vape tricks were one of the leading reasons they wanted to try vaping. So they took a quantitative look at the most popular vaping trick videos on YouTube to find out who’s making them and why they appeal to young people.  They found that the videos feature over 80 percent men. And that over half of those (mostly) bros were white.  More significantly, the researchers also found that nearly half of the videos were directly produced by vaping marketers or stores. It’s likely that the rest of the videos—many from vaping “influencers”—were actually sponsored by vaping companies, said lead researcher Grace Kong. The giveaway? Prominently featured products and logos.  “I don’t know if the private accounts are true private accounts, because they could be getting paid,” Kong said. In case you’ve been living under a rock, vaping (and Juuling) has spread so fast among teens that the U.S. Surgeon General has declared youth e-cigarette use an &#...

Chinese Girl Hospitalized, Doctors Find Hundreds of Undigested Bubble Tea Pearls in Stomach

A 14-year-old Chinese girl was hospitalized after she was constipated for five days, according to AsiaOne in a June 6 report, citing local media outlets. The girl from Zhejiang Province said she couldn’t eat, had stomach pains, and other symptoms, the report said. Her parents finally took her to the hospital on May 28. After an X-ray was performed, doctors spherical shapes in her abdomen. Doctors said that the round shadows were undigested tapioca pearls from bubble tea that she had consumed days prior. The girl said that she had the bubble tea about five days before her health problems surfaced, AsiaOne reported. Chinese girl suffers constipation for 5 days. The cause? Bubble tea pearlshttps://t.co/tqbTb1xa6b pic.twitter.com/8JKLkXxSs5 A doctor involved in the case said that he thinks that the girl was hiding her consumption of bubble tea from her parents, saying that she would have had to drink a lot for it to be this severe. Bubble tea pearls are generally made of starchy tapioca, which can be difficult for the body to digest. In 2015, there was a scandal involving bubble tea pearls, where a TV reporter in China’s Shandong Province found undigested pearls present in her stom...