Net-a-Porter adds beauty to its sustainable category

On Monday, the luxury e-commerce retailer expanded its Net Sustain program that launched in 2019 to include beauty for the first time. Twenty-seven beauty brands are included in the merchandising effort, including longstanding Net-a-Porter partners like Tata Harper, Aesop and Dr. Barbara Sturm, as well as upstarts such as One Ocean Beauty, Circumference and Cosmydor. Across beauty and fashion, 100 brands are now featured in the Net Sustain edit. Though sustainability talk reverberates across many categories, the beauty industry is one culprit that contributes the most to global waste. According to market research firm Euromonitor International, beauty companies accounted for nearly 153 billion units (individual pieces of plastic) in 2018. Forty percent of that contained single-use plastic and then wound up in a landfill. While Net-a-Porter is amping up its sustainable priorities, it is not creating a unified or singularly defined definition of what it means to be Net Sustain compliant. Rather, to be a part of the program, companies need to have one of seven key attributes: They use “considered materials and ingredients” (one example is to be Cosmos-certified), incorporate “consi...

China Bus Industry Research Report 2019-2025 Featuring 16 Major Enterprises: Profile, Operation, Output, Sales, Featured Products, Distribution, and More

Dublin, Nov. 13, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “China Bus Industry Report, 2019-2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. China as the world’s largest bus manufacturer supplies nearly 50% of buses in the global market. China’s bus industry has made changes over the years, with output sliding at an annual average rate of 6.1% between 2015 and 2018. The downtrend in output will continue in 2019, due to a lack of market dynamism. The electric, global and high-end buses will turn to be the driver for the Chinese bus market. By product, coaches and public buses account for over 80% in China. In 2018, sales of all types of buses suffered a slump, apart from public buses which enjoyed a slight increase. Public bus: in 2018, the public bus market size reached roughly 100,000 units, on a par with what it was in 2015 and 2017 but much less than that in the peak year of 2016. It was proof that the bus market in China was still being redefined. Thereof, 8m/10m buses had become the mainstay of the market and would sustain growth. Coach: in 2018, sales of this type of bus plummeted as other ways to travel such as high-speed trains, civil aircraft, private cars, and ride-...

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products we think you’ll

This story was written in collaboration with Forbes Finds. Forbes Finds covers products we think you’ll love. Featured products are independently selected and linked to for your convenience. If you buy something using a link on this page, Forbes may receive a small share of that sale. Replacing your old thermostat with something digital (that doesn’t look like an LED clock from the ’80s) shouldn’t be hard. But it is. Every manufacturer boasts about the same features—but which product is ultimately best for your household and lifestyle? If you’re looking for something that looks futuristic, the Glas Smart Thermostat is a great first choice. It looks like nothing else on the market and the transparent touchscreen practically disappears when the display is inactive, blending with your walls. It also does the digital thermostat things you’d expect, like keeping schedules and working with an app for programming. And it even has Microsoft Cortana built in, so you can speak to it for changing settings. Plus, Glas has an air quality sensor, something most other smart thermostats lack. Glas can even sense if you’re home or away, so don’t have to ...

E-cig companies use vape trick videos to market products, study shows

A decidedly lit phenomenon is the subject of a new study from a group of Yale researchers: vape trick videos on YouTube. The researchers previously found that — right behind fruity flavors — young people say vape tricks were one of the leading reasons they wanted to try vaping. So they took a quantitative look at the most popular vaping trick videos on YouTube to find out who’s making them and why they appeal to young people.  They found that the videos feature over 80 percent men. And that over half of those (mostly) bros were white.  More significantly, the researchers also found that nearly half of the videos were directly produced by vaping marketers or stores. It’s likely that the rest of the videos—many from vaping “influencers”—were actually sponsored by vaping companies, said lead researcher Grace Kong. The giveaway? Prominently featured products and logos.  “I don’t know if the private accounts are true private accounts, because they could be getting paid,” Kong said. In case you’ve been living under a rock, vaping (and Juuling) has spread so fast among teens that the U.S. Surgeon General has declared youth e-cigarette use an &#...

Chinese Girl Hospitalized, Doctors Find Hundreds of Undigested Bubble Tea Pearls in Stomach

A 14-year-old Chinese girl was hospitalized after she was constipated for five days, according to AsiaOne in a June 6 report, citing local media outlets. The girl from Zhejiang Province said she couldn’t eat, had stomach pains, and other symptoms, the report said. Her parents finally took her to the hospital on May 28. After an X-ray was performed, doctors spherical shapes in her abdomen. Doctors said that the round shadows were undigested tapioca pearls from bubble tea that she had consumed days prior. The girl said that she had the bubble tea about five days before her health problems surfaced, AsiaOne reported. Chinese girl suffers constipation for 5 days. The cause? Bubble tea pearlshttps://t.co/tqbTb1xa6b pic.twitter.com/8JKLkXxSs5 A doctor involved in the case said that he thinks that the girl was hiding her consumption of bubble tea from her parents, saying that she would have had to drink a lot for it to be this severe. Bubble tea pearls are generally made of starchy tapioca, which can be difficult for the body to digest. In 2015, there was a scandal involving bubble tea pearls, where a TV reporter in China’s Shandong Province found undigested pearls present in her stom...