Nano to pico to femto: Pulse widths for optimal laser micromachining outcomes

While several laser parameters affect the machining results, the choice of pulse width is one of the important factors that affect the precision, throughput, quality, and economics of the process. The goal of any machining process is to achieve the desired high-quality results in the shortest time possible and in the most economical way. Laser machining, compared to conventional mechanical machining techniques such as cutting, milling, and drilling, can achieve localized, high-quality, and precise machining. With the right choice of laser, one can also achieve a high-yield, high-throughput, and economical process. One industry where lasers are heavily used is in manufacturing mobile devices. The demand to make smaller, faster, lighter, and lower-cost mobile devices has required laser micromachining processes that can meet this challenge. Other industries, such as medical device manufacturing, clean energy, automotive, and aerospace, have also adopted laser machining to varying degrees. While several laser parameters affect the machining results, the choice of pulse width is one of the important factors that affect the precision, throughput, quality, and economics of the process....

Derek Lowe’s commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry. An editorially independent blog from the

Derek Lowe’s commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry. An editorially independent blog from the publishers of Science Translational Medicine. All content is Derek’s own, and he does not in any way speak for his employer. I last wrote about the situation with Catalyst Pharmaceuticals here last December when Firdapse, their drug for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, was approved by the FDA. If you know the story, though (or follow the links in that post) you’ll see that referring to it as “their drug” is a rather legalistic way of looking at things. Firdapse is 3,4-diaminopyridine, and it’s been used as a therapy for LEMS for many years. It was, in fact, provided free to the (few) patients with the disease by a small company called Jacobus Pharmaceuticals, until Catalyst saw a regulatory opportunity and hopped in with a chance to take an old generic compound and get marketing exclusivity by taking it through the modern FDA process. Whereupon they announced a price of $375,000 for the treatment. This has caused a great deal of uproar, and it should, but in that December post I laid a good chunk of the blame right on the FDA for allowing this sort of thing to happ...